Dual Meet Record

1975 - 2015

251 - 63  (.799)

Team Championships

Conference Sectional
1986
1995
2000
2002
2006
2008
2012
1990
1999
2001
2004
2007
2011
2013
1975
1979
1991
1996
2000
1978
1990
1992
1999
2004
 

Richwoods Records

Entering 2016 Season

4x800 9:45.5 Lynch, Ivory, Wood, Robertson '90
4x100 :48.3 Detra, Marks, C. Nash, Yates '13
3200 10:51.7 Amy Guard '00
100H :14.2 Brenna Detra '13
100 :11.8 Alisha Smith '04
800 2:15.5 Hallema Ivory '91
4x200 1:42.6 Johnson, Mitchell, Ross, Thomas '08
400 :56.3 Brenna Detra '13
300H :42.6 Brenna Detra '13
1600 5:09.0 Amy Guard '00
200 :24.2 Brenna Detra '12
4x400 4:00.9 Jackson, Lynch, Huffman, Ivory '90
SP 40'10¼" Jewel Sanders '06
Disc 148' 7" Jewel Sanders '06
LJ 19' 0" Brenna Detra '13
TJ 38' 5" Donielle Ross '08
HJ 5' 7" Alex Starks '07
PV 8' 8" Natalie Robbins '09

2016 IHSA Class AA

Qualifying Standards

4x800 9:52.80
4x100 :50.40
3200 11:37.20
100 H :15.90
100 :12.80
800 2:23.30
4x200 1:47.50
400 1:00.00
300 H :47.70
1600 5:20.90
200 :26.30
4x400 4:09.10
Shot Put 37' 11"
Discus 112' 2"
 Long Jump 16' 11.5"
Triple Jump 34' 9"
High Jump 5' 1"
 Pole Vault 9' 7"

 

Plantar Fasciitis


Plantar Fasciitis is a persistent pain located on the plantar (bottom) surface of the foot.

The plantar fascia is a fibrous, tendon-like structure that extends the entire length of the bottom of the foot, beginning at the heel bone and extending to the base of the toes. During excessive activity the plantar fascia can become irritated, inflamed and may even tear if the area is subjected to repetitive stress. Heel contact during the gait cycle exposes the medial-plantar aspect of the heel, where the plantar fascia attaches to the heel bone.

Symptoms:

  • Pain in  morning during first few steps subsiding with prolonged walking
  • Pain during athletic activity in the beginning and subsiding with activity.

 Causation:

  •  High-arch, rigid foot more susceptible
  • Flat, pronated foot more susceptible
  •  Improper shoes.
    • Too stiff-soled
    • Overworn shoes allowing overpronation
     
  •  Most common cause is sudden increase in the amount or intensity of activity within a short period of time.

Short Term Treatment:

  •  Elimination of external causative factors.
  • Medical exam, gait analysis and x-rays to check for a heel spur
  • Ice application.
  • Taping
  •  Complete rest or a reduction in exercise.
  •  Physical therapy
    • whirlpool
    • ultrasound.
  • Anti-inflammatory medication such as Ibuprofen.
  •  Prescrition anti-inflammatory medication
  • Cortisone injections.

Long Term Treatment:

 In cases that are persistent,

  • Orthotic devices
    •  High arches require softer orthotics for shock absorption.
    •  Flattened arches require a more rigid orthosis to control pronation.
  • Plantar fascia and calf muscle stretching exercises.